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Upper Shoreham Road: Frequently asked questions

Why is cycle infrastructure needed on Upper Shoreham Road?

We need safer streets to enable more, safer cycle journeys in our towns. The Department for Transport has made clear that the streets to prioritise are direct, useful, busy streets that move people efficiently to where they need to go. These streets should be updated with separated cycleways, compliant with DfT’s new design standards.

Upper Shoreham Road is arguably the most useful road in Shoreham, connecting thousands of homes to many schools, three shopping areas, a large park, and links east and west towards neighbouring towns.

Upper Shoreham Road was first documented as a key part of a future cycle network around 30 years ago, in a West Sussex County Council strategy document. This has been echoed in multiple plans and strategies, including several by Adur District Council – most recently in Adur & Worthing Councils’ Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan.

Every time any plan or strategy is produced for Adur district, Upper Shoreham Road is identified as a primary route.

Adur and Worthing Councils’ Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan shows Upper Shoreham Road as a primary route in need of change.

How will a cycle scheme improve safety on Upper Shoreham Road?

Upper Shoreham Road does not have a good safety record. Records show that collisions, incidents and related reports are commonplace.

Map by Sussex Safer Roads Partnership, showing reports of incidents on Upper Shoreham Road

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the scheme improving safety for all road users. Drivers, cyclists and pedestrians:

“The minimum lane width is 3m which would result in a major change to the feel of the road, making it feel more like an urban distributer road and Active Travel corridor than an ex- trunk road from the 1960s. The provision of a consistent width would have a traffic calming effect to help to keep driver speeds down and reduce conflict.”

“This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.”

“Any potholes within the scheme extent would also be looked at.”

“The scheme would provide a net safety benefit by providing protection for vulnerable road users such as walkers and cyclists.”

Will enough people use cycleways to make them worthwhile on Upper Shoreham Road?

Data on existing use shows a regular level of cycling on this key route. But the real potential lies in the people who don’t currently feel safe enough to cycle. During 2020’s temporary scheme, Upper Shoreham Road saw a spike in cycling numbers – particularly among children and women.

But experience of long-term street improvements in London and elsewhere shows that when people are enabled to cycle safely, the increase is rarely an overnight one. Instead, numbers build over several months, as confidence, familiarity and habits grow. After two years, the real potential of well-designed cycle infrastructure is witnessed in significant number.

This effect is recognised in the various strategic mapping and planning tools used by engineers and planners. This is why Upper Shoreham Road is repeatedly recognised as a primary route for Shoreham – to be prioritised.

Will cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road help children to get to school?

Yes. West Sussex County Council has carried out a school survey in January 2022 and has looked at travel patterns for the local school. It has shown that Upper Shoreham Road is the most useful road for parents taking their children to all of the junior schools.

Upper Shoreham Road serves five junior schools and two secondary schools – more than any other road in Shoreham. With 200 children a year travelling to Sir Robert Woodard Academy (and this number is forecast to increase), a cycle lane on Upper Shoreham Road will greatly benefit them and all school children.

One of the many children who used temporary lanes to get to school in 2020

Safe journeys to schools rely on two things: reduction of traffic danger on roads close to schools, but, really importantly, safe, separated routes through towns towards school areas. Upper Shoreham Road is vital for this.

Will future cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road be the same as the pop-up cycle lanes?

No. Any proposed cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road will be very different. 2020’s pop-up cycle scheme was installed very quickly, with little time for careful design and without any consultation. A future, permanent scheme will have gone through extensive consultation and design. It will be attractive and will be of a high quality which will enhance the road for all users and residents.

A possible layout and appearance for an improved Upper Shoreham Road

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the proposed new scheme on Upper Shoreham Road:

“[any proposed scheme] would result in a major change to the feel of the road, making it feel more like an urban distributer road and Active Travel corridor than an ex- trunk road from the 1960s. The provision of a consistent width would have a traffic calming effect to help to keep driver speeds down and reduce conflict.”

“This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.”

Will I be able to park my car on Upper Shoreham Road?

Yes. There will still be more than enough car parking spaces. 

A potential future layout for Upper Shoreham Road, showing spaces for car parking.

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the proposed scheme on Upper Shoreham Road:

The level of parking demand has been measured and this information would inform the design as it develops to ensure that the need for on – street parking can be given adequate consideration in each location. This will ensure that parking displacement is minimised.

“A parking survey carried out along Upper Shoreham Road confirmed that there is sufficient parking available along this road which, at most times, remain unoccupied.”

“As part of this cycle scheme, formal parking bays would still be provided except at critical locations where road widths are less than the required highway standard widths and any loss of the total existing parking would be minimal.”

“Any subsequent permanent scheme would be designed to take the need for parking into account.”

“The Council would intend to provide adequate levels of on- street parking within a permanent scheme – hence there would be a reduced need to park in neighbouring roads.” 

“Blue badge parking should remain unaffected. Disabled residents requiring parking outside of their properties should contact the council directly and acquire a blue badge parking permit.” 

What about disabled parking?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about disabled parking on Upper Shoreham Road:

“Blue badge parking should remain unaffected. Disabled residents requiring parking outside of their properties should contact the council directly and acquire a blue badge parking permit.” 

Carefully laid-out parking areas can be part of Upper Shoreham Road’s upgrade.

What about pedestrians? Will walking be improved on Upper Shoreham Road?

Pedestrian crossing points are vital for Upper Shoreham Road, and they will be improved. The current ‘traffic islands’ are not official crossing points, don’t have dropped kerbs, and are not suitable for wheelchair users or parents with buggies. They create dangerous pinch points when drivers overtake people on bikes. They are not fit for purpose. 

Pedestrians crossings must be added to Upper Shoreham Road

Many side roads on Upper Shoreham Road have very wide junctions, creating more danger for people crossing as they walk, and encouraging speed from drivers. Modern design would see these junctions narrowed and made much safer.

There is a benefit to pedestrians (and homeowners) on Upper Shoreham Road in that the moving traffic will be slightly further away from people walking, which has been proven to reduce the pollution that people walking are exposed to.

There is also an added benefit that the vehicle speeds will be reduced on Upper Shoreham Road due to the scheme.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about pedestrian safety on Upper Shoreham Road:

Pedestrian safety has also been considered as part of this scheme. For example, reduced crossing distance at critical junctions, WSCC compliant refuge islands and crossing points have been provided at the desire lines.”

“The existing islands do not have compliant width for pedestrians to stand and wait and therefore have been proposed to be removed. The new refuge islands are wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs and buggies and have been proposed at desire lines i.e., at locations where people are more likely to cross for e.g., near bus stops.”

This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.


Will the cycle lanes cause congestion or increase driving journey times?

No. The pop-up cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road was tested multiple times and did not impact journey times in any way. Similarly, a permanent scheme should have no impact on journey times. As a two-lane road, there will be no reduction in available driving lanes. No real change for driving along Upper Shoreham Road.

West Sussex County Council montoried journey times when the pop up lanes were in place and this is what they said:

“WSCC Officers conducted several dash-cam recorded and timed drive throughs of the Shoreham (pop up) scheme in response to public concerns about traffic congestion and travel times.

“The mean vehicle speeds through the monitored areas, over a 24-hour period are unchanged by the scheme.”

What about emergency services?

West Sussex County Council consulted all three emergency services throughout the pop-up cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road and they will also be consulted on any future designs and their feedback will be taken into account.

An ambulance making progress through a street with cycle lanes

Here’s what West Sussex County Council said about the pop-up scheme in their report:

We remain in regular contact with all three emergency services and are closely monitoring the impact on blue light services. Although concerns have often been raised by the public regarding emergency vehicles being unable to navigate the scheme at busy periods, this does not reflect the regular feedback from the Emergency Services.”

Will they fix the potholes?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about fixing potholes on Upper Shoreham Road:

“Any potholes within the scheme extent would also be looked at.”

A pothole – to be repaired as part of Upper Shoreham Road improvements

Will cycle lanes cause more pollution?

There is absolutely nothing to suggest that the installation of quality cycleways will cause any increase in pollution. In the long term, it is highly likely to reduce pollution.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about air quality on Upper Shoreham Road when the pop up cycle lanes were in place:

“The pop-up cycle scheme in Shoreham has not materially affected traffic columns and flows, so an increase in pollution is not expected. There is some evidence to suggest more parents and pupils are walking and/or cycling to school, which should positively impact local air quality.”

Will it make it more difficult to get out of driveways?

Good design standards from the Department for Transport provide for easy entrance and exit into and from residents’ driveways.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about driveway safety on Upper Shoreham Road:

“The proposed design should have minimal to no effect on the use and access of the existing driveways and properties.”

How many people will use cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road?

Cycle infrastructure is important to help create positive change. Research shows that levels of cycling increase very much in the two years following construction. This increase in cycling numbers is rarely instant, but it does happen.

Nonetheless, when West Sussex County Council installed its 2020 temporary scheme on Upper Shoreham Road, there was a very significant, almost instant increase in numbers, as people felt they could cycle more safely.

WSCC installed traffic monitoring equipment to count the number of cycle trips on Upper Shoreham Road during the time the pop up cycle scheme was in place and for the three months they were in place there were over 30,000 cycle trips recorded.

Usage levels of 2020’s temporary cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road

Has there been consultation on this?

West Sussex County Council has carried out extensive consultation on Upper Shoreham Road cycle lanes since 2020. They have consulted the public several times with many surveys and consultations. They have sought the views of emergency services, stakeholders, community groups, businesses and local councillors.

The Department for Transport has written to WSCC to make it very clear that consultations are not to be treated as referendums. Consultations are not ballots: they are opportunities for local authorities to listen to feedback, accommodate concerns and make refinements. The DfT does not expect consultations to return majority or consensus, as they know that levels of support always increase after consultation.

Do people support this?

Unquestionably. There is never instant 100% support for updating streets, but the level of support shown for improving Upper Shoreham Road has been shown, many times, to exceed the levels expected or required by the Department for Transport.

  • 2019 Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan consultation:
    89% of all local people who responded supported improving the cycling network
  • 2019 Adur & Worthing Open Space Study:
    78% of households confirmed that they would be prepared to walk/cycle further if the quality of the route was improved; and 81% also said that if the quality of the route was improved they would make the journey more often.
  • 2020 Shoreham Society Survey:
    60% of respondents said there are not enough safe cycle routes
  • 2020 Survey by Tim Loughton MP and Cllr Kevin Boram
    68% supported additional cycle routes and walking schemes
  • 2021 West Sussex County Council Active Travel Plan engagement
    65% support a permanent high quality cycling facility on Upper Shoreham Road
  • 2021 West Sussex County Council Active Travel Engagement
    Overall support and opposition for cycle lanes for Upper Shoreham Road was almost equal, with those opposing to some extent at 48% (788 respondents) compared to 48% (776 respondents) in support to some extent. A difference of 12 people. There is not strong opposition to installing safe segregated cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road, and support is higher than the level required by Department for Transport

How long have our councils been talking about a cycle route on Upper Shoreham Road?

Shoreham-By-Cycle has sourced many council documents, plans and strategies going back 30 years where there have been proposed cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road and talk of making Upper Shoreham Road safer for people to cycle on. These go back as far as West Sussex County Council’s Cycling Strategy 1994 and Adur District Council’s Cycling Strategy 1997, right up to Adur and Worthing Council’s 2020 Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan.

Documents from the 1990s, including a proposal to create a cycle route along Upper Shoreham Road

What standards are the proposals being designed to?

The project will seek to meet the guidance detailed for local authorities in the Government Local Transport Note 1/20 (Cycle Infrastructure Design). Beyond that, the Manual for Streets and the West Sussex Cycle Design Guide will also be considered.

The Department for Transport has recently set high standards for cycle infrastructure design

How much will this cost?

It is currently unclear what the final cost will be. However a rough guide is that it costs around £1.5 million per mile of cycle lane. Cycle infrastructure has been proven time and time again to be a very cost effective spend on infrastructure compared to other road infrastructure. For example the new roundabout on the A27 by New Monks Farm is currently projected to cost £25 million for one roundabout.

In order to be successful, any bid to the Government’s Active Travel Fund would need to demonstrate good Value for Money (VfM), which walking and cycle schemes generally do.

How will this be funded?

In 2020 the government promised £5 billion to improve bus and cycle routes outside of London. This will also be part of the government’s commitment on Active Travel, so will be funded by central government rather than local council tax.

Funding for the walking and cycling proposals will be dependent on a successful bid to the Tranche 4 of the DfT’s Active Travel Fund, which is expected to be announced later this year.

Is Upper Shoreham Road wide enough to put a cycle lane on?

Yes. Upper Shoreham Road, as the widest road in Shoreham, is more than wide enough to put safe cycle lanes in. There is no technical reason not to install cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road and improve safety for all road users.

A possible layout that makes better use of Upper Shoreham Road’s space


Here’s what West Sussex County Council has said about it:

Measurements have been taken at pinch points and it has been confirmed that sufficient width exists for the scheme options as presented, although we expect some adjustments to occur as the design progresses.”

Will cycle lanes help reduce the number of people cycling on the pavements?

Yes. With improved conditions for cycling, Shoreham-By-Cycle has monitored incidence of pavement cycling, which has been observed to reduce to just 25% of previous levels when cycle lanes are present. Pavement cycling is between three and five times more likely to occur where a cycle lane is not available.(Based on surveys conducted on Upper Shoreham Road in July 2020 and November 2020)

Have alternative routes been looked at?


Some councillors and commentators can be heard to suggest that a cycleway should take a different route through Shoreham. 

Upper Shoreham Road is the only road in Shoreham (apart from the A259)  which runs the whole length from east to west through Shoreham. It has been identified for 30 years as a strategic route which will benefit residents of north Shoreham, especially schoolchildren getting to and from school. An attempt to replicate Upper Shoreham Road’s utility along parallel streets would be impossible, leading instead to a twisting, complicated route with more danger, more hazards and more junctions – on streets too narrow to install proper infrastructure.

Here’s what West Sussex County Council say about it:

Alternative routes have been looked at and Upper Shoreham Road was prioritised because it was previously a pop-up scheme and it appears in the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan and is a top priority for Adur [District] Council.”

Will any trees or green spaces be removed near Buckingham Park?



There are no plans for any trees or any green spaces by Buckingham Park to be removed as part of any scheme to install cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road. There is more than enough space to create cycleways without any risk to these trees or green areas.

We are aware of a number of false rumours that have been circulated about this and they are untrue.

Will grass verges be removed?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the removal of grass verges:

“Where possible removal of verge would be avoided. However, to ensure sufficient footway width is provided removal of verge would be required at critical locations.”

Will the scheme have an effect on road traffic noise?

Any proposed scheme should have a positive impact on traffic noise, doing away with the wasted space of a central reservation and other relics of an old trunk road, reducing speeding and making it feel more like the residential connector street it is.

Didn’t West Sussex County Council go to court over this?

Yes. West Sussex County Council admitted that they removed the pop up cycle lanes unlawfully. 

However, it is important to know that no-one is proposing to replace the pop-up lanes with a similar design. Instead, as WSCC have assured DfT is possible, we could see a serious, attractive, useful design, enabling WSCC to put right its past mistakes and the people of Shoreham to have more options for their short journeys.

Adur local elections 2022: Who should you vote for?

This Thursday, 5 May 2022, the people of Adur district get to elect some of the councillors who will make important decisions in Shoreham, as well as in neighbouring towns like Southwick and Lancing.

Adur District Council handles matters like planning and environment – and while it’s West Sussex County Council that governs roads and infrastructure, ADC does hold some influence here, and has determined a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan.

Map showing Shoreham’s planned cycle network, from Adur & Worthing Councils’ Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan

Shoreham-By-Cycle will not tell you how to vote this Thursday. But we do encourage you to choose the candidates who you think will help our town and our district to make significant progress on important matters.

We offered all parties and candidates some questions to help clarify their positions on cycling, walking and transport. We received many responses – all of which you can see here. Find the responses for your ward, and consider the alternatives. You can use WriteToThem to check which ward you live in.

To help make sense of the options you have, and to focus your mind, we suggest these four considerations:

Which candidate understands the situation?

Does every candidate show evidence that they understand the transport problems Adur faces: pollution, congestion, danger, and streets that actively discourage people from choosing cycling and walking, in a district that is growing ever more crowded? Do they consider cycling to be a niche interest of children and enthusiasts, or a growing practical transport choice used by many people for regular journeys in towns across the UK?

Which candidate understands the possible solutions?

Does every candidate have a good grasp of the available options? Have they read the Department for Transport’s ‘Gear Change’ document that sets clear expectations for local authorities? Do they understand why key streets – like Upper Shoreham Road – are prioritised as primary routes, or would they prefer to push the challenges into other roads? Do they understand the basics of ideas like network management duty, school streets, separated cycleways and low traffic neighbourhoods?

We don’t expect every councillor to be a specialist, but we feel they should have taken on the important basics.

Which candidate is able to go into detail?

Some candidates are ready to share their thoughts on particular areas and streets. Some offer detail on changes they would like to see. Others can be vague and non-specific, talking in general terms, without detail. Consider which is more credible. Who has given active travel serious consideration, and who is giving it lip-service?

Will they deliver?

Positive aspirations, endless consultations and wordy strategies are all well and good, but it’s delivery that has been sadly lacking in the three decades our councils have been discussing cycle infrastructure.

In 2020, Adur District Council produced a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan – endorsed by ADC leader Cllr Neil Parkin and unanimously accepted by a committee of councillors that includes some seeking your vote this week.

So which candidates have got what it takes to make things happen – to work with their colleagues (across parties), with council officers, and with WSCC, to ensure that numerous documents, policies and strategies give rise to more than just more words.

Want more information? See the responses candidates gave to Shoreham-By-Cycle’s questions.

And if you’d like to be part of of Shoreham-By-Cycle, you can become a member of this growing community group.

2022 local election candidates: Hillside ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for Hillside Ward in Southwick. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

To view candidates for a different ward, see our main 2022 local elections page.

Candidate: Rebecca Allinson
Party: Labour

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

As a councillor I will press for a network of safe cycling routes across Adur. 

We seem to have an endless series of consultations, often poorly organised, on cycle routes, but little action. As a councillor I will want to see genuine discussion between the planners and local people so we can work together to make Adur a better, safer place. 

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

I cycle a lot and I experience the pot-holes, poor road surfaces and speeding traffic of Hillside. These things are dangerous for cyclists and I will press the county council to do its job to bring our roads up to standard and to review speed limits. It’s odd that Mile Oak Road is 30mph until the Portslade boundary when it becomes 20mph. 20mph should be the norm for urban areas. That makes sense for safety and reducing pollution.  

A consultation has just closed on a cycle route along the A259 through Southwick to Hove. Some of what is suggested is very positive but how does someone cycling from Hillside reach that cycle lane?  We should have safe cycle routes down to Southwick Green, the Square, the A259, the beach and, of course, to Shoreham Academy. 

As well as north-south, I would like to look at whether the services roads alongside Old Shoreham Road could be an opportunity for safe cycling east-west. 

Something should also be done about access to Holmbush. Most people doing the weekly shop will come by car or bus, but it should be made easier for people to pop in on their cycles or by foot, and for staff to cycle too. That would be good for the individual and for the environment. What we have now is entirely designed for cars while cyclists have to take to the winding, narrow pavement. We should be making it easier to cycle, not creating obstacle courses.  

Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Transport is the biggest cause of pollution in Adur so we would like to make leaving the car behind a viable option. Cycling to work, to the station, to school, to the shops or for leisure should be easier and safer. I support more places to park cycles in town centres and workplaces, more 20mph speed limit zones and an affordable integrated public transport system. More about our Labour policies are on: https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

2022 local election candidates: Mash Barn ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for Mash Barn ward in Lancing. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

  • Lee Cowen, Labour
  • Carina Livingstone, Green Party – no reply received yet
  • Doris Martin, Liberal Democrats – no reply received yet
  • Mike Mendoza, Conservative – no reply received yet

    To view candidates for a different ward, see our main 2022 local elections page.

Candidate: Lee Cowen
Party: Labour

What will you do (and, if incumbent, what have you already done) to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

I’m the leader of the Labour group, the opposition to the Conservatives who are the current majority on Adur District Council. As leader, my aim has been to ensure Labour listens to local people and put the interests of local people and their well-being at the heart of everything we do.

To support well-being we must support measures to reduce pollution and to make it easier for young and old to cycle safely. My ward is Lancing and many people have little alternative than to use a car because of the lack of affordable reliable public transport or safe cycling routes. This must change.

I campaigned against IKEA which would have caused more road traffic, congestion and pollution to Lancing. The provision to cross the A27 is inadequate in my opinion.

I have argued that new developments across the district must mitigate their impact by providing improved local infrastructure including cycle lanes and cycle racks.

There doesn’t appear to be a holistic approach to planning and development whatsoever with developers and councillors seen to be passing the buck.

I want to see improvements made where targets are set and adhered to.

In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

The County Council has consulted on possible cycle routes in Lancing, including Grinstead Lane and South Street and along Upper Brighton Road/Cokeham Road/Crabtree Lane. I’m not sure many people even knew that a consultation took place. I support genuine consultation, where councils listen to people and discuss with them how we can, together, improve our areas, not repeated on-line surveys.

Many families and school children are nervous about riding cycles on our busy roads. The A27 is one of those routes but with the New Monks Farm development currently under construction I will ensure that a safe route is always available.

We often see cars parked on cycle lanes and blocking sightlines at junctions. We need improved reporting mechanisms and enforcement. The prevalence of potholes on our local roads can be very dangerous for vulnerable cyclists.

Labour councillors have and will continue to call for genuine improvements as a matter of urgency, not just something to be put into a plan and not implemented.

Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

We favour policies that will make it easier for people to choose to leave the car behind for many journeys. That’s not how new developments in Adur are being designed along the A27 or the A259.  It should be easier and safer, for local people to cycle to work, to school, to the shops or for leisure.

I support more places to park cycles in town centres and workplaces, more 20mph speed limit zones and an affordable integrated public transport system.

More about our Labour policies are on: https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

2022 local election candidates: St Mary’s ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for St Mary’s ward. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

Candidate: Catherine Arnold
Party: Labour

1. What will you do (and, if incumbent, what have you already done) to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

In my four years as councillor for St Mary’s I have always spoken out for and campaigned for better and permanent safer cycling infrastructure and lanes. When we face an impending environmental collapse, to put it simply, we must be getting out of our cars and start walking and cycling more.

As a keen cyclist myself with young children I have seen first-hand how much more confident children become when they are protected from the traffic while cycling. Equally, I’ve seen that same child no longer wish to cycle as they are too frightened to be so near the traffic. That’s heart-breaking. I spoke out against the removal of the cycle lane on Upper Shoreham Road, purely on the basis of the data which showed how popular the cycle lane was. Refinements were needed and I recognise that some adaptations will be needed when it returns, but through collaboration I am sure this can be achieved.

I have responded to and encouraged others to give their views to the many consultations we have had on cycle lanes and done so myself.

Many good ideas have been put forward, but deeply opposing views have been used as an excuse to ignore the uptake data and for over-consulting.  Routes within Adur that link together can only serve to fulfil the needs of commuters, schoolchildren, disabled cyclists etc. This starts with a permanent and segregated Upper Shoreham Road cycle lane stretching from the west by the Toll Bridge and continuing to the Holmbush roundabout.

I also support the leisure bike hire scheme as well as plenty of bike racks, bike storage (as we see in Worthing), a crackdown on bike thefts and free Bikeability courses offered by WSCC to schools. I would like to see a trial of a school street, where on certain days schools shut their street and therefore pupils and parents can cycle or walk in.

As a councillor, I want to see budgets sought and secured, plans enabled and all councillors at a district and county level working together to make it happen.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

The air quality in Shoreham High Street has been noted as an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA). Despite writing numerous reports and submitting them to DEFRA yearly, the council has done little to materially change this situation over the years. I would like to see better air quality data capture and known (and arising area) hotspots targeted for cycle infrastructure first. This would improve the air quality situation and resultant health issues.

When commercial developments are built, I want to see those agreed travel plans adhered to and if not successfully achieved, interventions to make them happen. We cannot have the line “we need fewer car spaces at housing developments to tackle the climate” yet no supporting cycle infrastructure provided to alleviate the need for cars at said developments.

In St Mary’s many people of all ages want the opportunity to cycle safely. It is especially important for children and young adults and we need safer routes to Shoreham Academy and to Sir Robert Woodard Academy (SRWA). The county council’s refusal to see that the current route to school for pupils to SRWA is along a 70mph down to 40mph stretch of the A27, is dangerous and dismissive of parental concerns.  A protected cycle way needs to be sought here ASAP by WSCC and any new business inheriting the ex-IKEA land needs to factor this into their plans too.

The county council needs to win back respect on all sides, cease relentless surveys and consultations on the idea of cycle lanes, and come up with designs and funding. It must speak directly with stakeholders at a time that suits them and not the council.

Ideas for Middle Road, Eastern Avenue, Upper Shoreham Road need to be driven by officers, in consultation within councillors.

As a councillor I will insist on genuine local involvement, including schools, to bring about change and to ensure safe, active travel becomes a viable option sooner rather than later. We would implement the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan so families can cycle safely – well designed and planned with local residents who walk, cycle or drive.

 3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

1/3rd of carbon emissions in Adur comes from traffic, as individuals and businesses we need to be using our cars much less and walking and cycling more. As a local Labour group we still ask for an integrated travel system (like TfL) and continue to press this.

The council need to encourage more car sharing schemes and work with business parks to provide electric, shuttle buses or bike storage to encourage sustainable travel to large employment sites. WSCC need to stop procuring school buses on the cheapest wins basis and start to ensure certain contractors winning a certain size of business offer sustainable solutions.

Part of the issue for the unwillingness to switch from a car is cost (petrol/diesel has historically been cheaper than a bus/train ticket) .So I would like to see more electric car share/hire schemes, more bicycle “hire for the week schemes” and bike repair cafes being offered by the council/local suppliers to larger employers. I would welcome an electric scooter hire scheme for coastal stretches in the future too. I would like to make it easier for people to choose to leave the car behind. It should be easier and safer for local people to cycle to work, to school, to the shops or for leisure. I support more cycle lanes, more places to park cycles in town centres and workplaces, more 20mph speed limit zones and an affordable integrated public transport system.

More information about the policies I support is at https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

Upper Shoreham Road: so many reasons for improvement

Over eight months since the last round of consultation, we still await West Sussex County Council’s decision regarding the next steps for Upper Shoreham Road – not with a return to temporary lanes of orange wands, but with a well-designed, attractive set of improvements that will work well for all.

With so much of Shoreham’s planned cycle network still to be built, why has there been so much ongoing fuss about Upper Shoreham Road, you may ask?

It’s a fair question, with several answers:

Upper Shoreham Road is useful.

No other road in Shoreham connects so many homes to destinations like schools, shops and green spaces (while coming close to the town centre and railway station). Space for cycling on Upper Shoreham Road will help many people to make many types of everyday journey.

Upper Shoreham Road has waited long enough.

The street was first identified by WSCC as a key cycling route 30 years ago. Since then it has been highlighted in multiple studies, plans and strategies, at district, county and even national levels. Despite three decades of ambition, there has been no action to create high-quality well-designed improvements.

Upper Shoreham Road is outdated.

Its current layout harks back to before the construction of the A27 Shoreham bypass. By today’s design standards, Upper Shoreham Road resembles a trunk road, not a residential street.

Upper Shoreham Road needs to be better for walking.

Its facilities for walking are in need of improvement. People getting about on foot are not kept safe enough by the wide-splayed side road crossings and improvised crossing islands. These need updating.

Upper Shoreham Road can work for all.

For much of its length, Upper Shoreham Road is wide enough to accommodate various needs without competition. Space for cycling, for car parking, for walking, and for driving can all co-exist with some smart design. Preliminary work by WSCC’s engineers has shown residents and councillors how this may be achieved.

Upper Shoreham Road is supported.

The Department for Transport – the experts in creating safer streets – know that levels of support for such projects always grows, sometimes from an initial low level, often to a very high level as people see and feel the benefit. The last consultation showed a 48% level of support, and a 48% level of opposition, giving Upper Shoreham Road a headstart in public acceptance of positive change.

Upper Shoreham Road is the easiest place to start.

Though WSCC have assured us that different areas of Shoreham are not to be considered alternatives in decision-making around cycling, we know that some have questioned whether other roads should be first in line when it comes to creating the next link in Shoreham’s cycling network. Many of the alternatives mentioned will bring huge challenges, for both engineering and politics. Upper Shoreham Road is, frankly, the easiest place to make a start. We have consulted with independent engineers who regard Upper Shoreham Road as a golden opportunity.

We continue to communicate with county councillors, district councillors and our MP, Tim Loughton, on behalf of our growing membership. You can add your voice to this growing movement by becoming a member of Shoreham-By-Cycle.

2022 local election candidates: St Nicolas ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for St Nicolas ward. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

Candidate: Julian Shinn
Party: Green Party

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

My guarantee as a Green candidate is a genuine commitment to cycling & other forms of active travel. When you vote for a Green candidate, you know where my priorities lie. You know that my fundamental concern is the climate crisis facing our planet & people and that I will work persistently to address this challenge on a local basis. 

One key part of that challenge is the urgent need to re-think the way we move around. For all the many benefits it has bought us, the internal combustion engine is destroying our planet, choking our children, and clogging up our capacity to get around.

It is essential to our future that we re-design our living environment to allow and encourage people to move away from the car and enjoy other methods of moving around – walking, cycling, mobility vehicles, other wheeled transport (scooters, etc) and public transport. 

In our future, the current priority given to motor vehicles – even electric – cannot be sustained. It is inefficient, unequal, and dangerous, especially when operating in the same spaces as pedestrians and cyclists.

This is the bottom line. And whilst many solutions lie at national government and county council level, I will do everything in my power, if elected as district councillor, to promote cycling as a key component of active travel.

This means holding cycling safety and infrastructure high and central in my priorities, making strong and persistent arguments for change, supporting local campaigns, and showing leadership. 

Leadership means advocating change not because it is the prevailing political mood, but because the future health of planet and people demand it. It means taking brave decisions, even in the face of opposition and not hiding behind consultation after consultation.

Consultation on the nature and design of improvements is, of course, important and all stakeholders need to be involved in this, but the decisions for change need to be clear and determined. This had very sadly been lacking over many, many years at district and county level.

I believe that, at district level, it is possible to effect change and, as we gain more Green councillors in years ahead, this impact will grow. 

There’s much that can be done already. Motions of support for cycling and other travel infrastructure at district level will influence county planning. Giving support to campaigning initiatives, such as the Red Lion crossing, can add weight and legitimacy. Raising cycling infrastructure in regard to all planning applications, with generous targets for bicycle use, storage and access.

Let me address specifics…

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

I will be supporting and proposing a number of initiatives –

  1. A motion of support for a 20mph speed limit for all residential areas of Shoreham and throughout the district. Evidence has shown that this improves safety significantly for cyclists & pedestrians, it is not an expensive change and I believe the motion of support would create a strong signal of support for county council decision making.
  2. Place pressure on the county council to complete the Red Lion crossing.
  3. Urgently address Middle Road cycling infrastructure which persistently places our young people at risk as they head to and from Shoreham Academy.
  4. Give persistent support to the campaign to develop infrastructure for the Upper Shoreham Road which is designed to the best specifications and creates a safe artery for cyclists, pedestrians, and mobility vehicles.
  5. Give similar support to and lobby for the development of the A259 artery.
  6. Lobby for all cycling infrastructure to meet Department for Transport “Gear Change” Key Design principles (attached).
  7. Continue to lobby and support extension of cycle share schemes into the Adur area .
  8. With local stakeholders, develop a blueprint for effective cycling arteries throughout the district – east to west and north to south.
  9. Scrutinise planning applications to ensure that cyclist provision and infrastructure is a key component within any new build.
  10. Lobby for ‘before and after’ school road closure schemes at local schools (eg. Swiss Gardens, Shoreham Academy / Hammy Lane entrance)

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Very much so! As I explained above, our ambition should be for a network of ‘movement arteries’ across our area which allows and incentivises safe, active travel.

  1. Scrutiny of all planning applications to ensure they promote rather than restrict pedestrian through-paths.
  2. Further pedestrian development in Shoreham and throughout the district. Specifically in Shoreham to promote pedestrian walkways from Station / Pond Lane right through to Ferry Road and Shoreham Beach.
  3. Given the development of the New Monks Farm area, to lobby for an A27 limited bus service to provide a ‘northern public transport artery’ to the district.
  4. Lobby for bus lane infrastructure on the A259 to increase the efficiency / reliability of the Stagecoach 700 service between Worthing and Brighton.
  5. Lobby for improvement to bus services north of the Upper Shoreham Road including frequency and timing of the Compass 19 service.
  6. Lobby for ticket integration between companies – Stagecoach / Compass / Brighton & Hove – to minimise multiple tickets over extended journeys.
  7. Lobby for extension of Car Share schemes into the Adur area. Car clubs reduce private car ownership and congestion. Ensure all new developments have ‘Car Club’ parking provision.
  8. Lobby with Southern Rail to improve the capacity and frequency of West Coastway services. This is an essential public travel artery and services should include larger, more frequent trains.

2022 local election candidates: Manor ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for Manor ward. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

To view candidates for a different ward, see our main 2022 local elections page.

Candidate: Maggie Rumble
Party: Green Party

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

Engage residents in discussion about what they want from cycling provision.

I would suggest dedicated cycle lanes, not just coned off bits of road, more cycle racks and cycle storage areas, making it easier to take bikes on trains,  greater & more visible profile given to safer cycle friendly routes through towns.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

Place 20 mph speed limits in residential areas and close to schools. Better enforcement of existing speed limits. Possible restriction of motor transport close to schools at certain times of day (e.g. North Lancing Primary).  Provision of more cycle tracks and better maintenance of existing ones. Ensuring cycle routes join up sensibly and don’t just end abruptly on ordinary roads. For example, extending the cycle track from Shoreham to Lancing along the A27 towards Worthing. And adding a cycle track on the north side of the A27 between Manor Road and Hoe Court. Improving a north-south route through Lancing.  Adding dropped kerbs where appropriate.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Cyclists’ and pedestrians’ needs to be considered for all new development.

Provision of secure cycle storage close to railway stations and other transport hubs. 

Candidate: Nigel Sweet
Party: Labour & Co-operative

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

I believe I was a newly elected Adur councillor in 1996 when the first moves were made towards forming a policy and some goals for the council. I was a keen cyclist then but I’m less keen now due to my age, the local road conditions and air quality problems. If elected on May 5, I realise that Adur District Council on its own cannot transform cycling, sustainable transport and public transport. We need urgent co-operative action across all local and National government, and as a new member of the Labour Group of Adur councillors that would be my aim. 

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

I am no expert on planning for cycling and sustainable transport, and so I would ensure experts in the field, as well as representatives of transport users and operators, figure centrally in any plan making. I believe we have the expertise but lack the political will and commitment which I can provide.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Ambition for improvements for the people you aim to represent is essential for any aspiring politician, and I have that in buckets full!  That ambition covers many issues including cycling, sustainable transport and reducing pollution. The local Labour Party’s policy is set out here…  https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

2022 local election candidates: Southwick Green ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for Southwick Green ward in Southwick. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

To view candidates for a different ward, see our main 2022 local elections page.

Candidate: David Batchelor
Party: Liberal Democrat

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

Now we have the bones of a network we need to facilitate the actual use of bikes. That means more secure parking in town centres, bike storage for residents without garages, and integration with other public transport. If elected, LibDem councillors will use carbon free transport wherever practicable when carrying out their duties. As councillors, we would use the current hike in petrol prices as a rallying cry to encourage more low carbon travel options, including cycling and walking.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges
or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy
everyday journeys by bike?


It’s a real shame that cycle facilities have passed us by in Southwick. We need cycleways to link the schools, Buckingham Park, Southwick Square and Holmbush. Anyone that braves the Brighton Road or Upper Shoreham Road knows that cycling to Hove and Brighton is not for the faint-hearted and needs sorting.

As the fiasco with Upper Shoreham Road demonstrated, cycle schemes are
tolerated and begrudgingly adopted by Tory councillors after central
government pressure. Cycles are equal and vulnerable road users. There are
not enough segregated safe spaces to give cyclists of all levels of experience
the confidence to use bikes as everyday transport and exercise. In the past,
shared spaces have often been poorly designed and caused friction between
users. Cycling will not be an afterthought for LibDem councillors.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

We will create a cyclists’ Adur Ring. It will link the Coastal Path, Downs Link
and South Downs Way. It will be a marked and branded circuit that will link the
beach to the downs and the river. It will provide a cycling link between
Shoreham and Southwick as well as a link northward to Steyning. It will provide
an opportunity for more residents to use bikes to travel safely between local

towns. It will be a fabulous accessible recreation facility and another amenity to attract visitors. We shall be doing more work on the precise route of the
Adur Ring and, in due course, will publish details on Facebook
@FocusonShorehamanSouthwick.

Candidate: Jude Harvey
Party: Labour

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

Consultation has just closed on a possible cycle route along the A259 through Southwick to Hove. Many good ideas were put forward, but it seems to me that over the years council officers put forward good ideas only for Conservative councillors to come up with reasons why we should not do them. As a councillor I want to see action, I want to see improvements made.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

I cycle most days in Southwick and experience the pot-holes and poor road surfaces that entails. I will press the county council to do more on that. The issue of potholes is extremely important. They can burst a car’s tyre but they can throw a cyclist from their bike on a busy road used by heavy lorries – Kingston Lane for example. It’s also difficult for a cyclist to be watching out for potholes at the same time as gauging traffic behaviour.

I will also argue for more reminders of the speed limit would be helpful. Signs that remind motorists of the place of cyclists in the new highway code hierarchy of road users at strategic points would be worthwhile too.

As an Adur councillor for Southwick Green I will want to see improvements to the Square so that it is more bike friendly, including more parking places for bicycles. Much more needs to be done and I will talk to residents about that. On-line surveys and consultations by the county council are one thing, but we need genuine local involvement to bring about change.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Transport is the biggest cause of pollution in Adur so we would like to make it easier for people to choose to leave the car behind. It should be easier and safer for local people to cycle to work, to school, to the shops or for leisure. I support more cycle lanes, more places to park cycles in town centres and workplaces, more 20mph speed limit zones and an affordable integrated public transport system. More about the policies I support are on https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

2022 local election candidates: Southlands ward

We have asked all candidates in May’s Adur District Council elections to answer some questions on cycling and transport, to help residents decide on their vote.

Here are the responses we have received so far for Southlands ward in Shoreham-by-Sea. If you do not see a response from a candidate you’re looking for, we have not yet received one, and we’ll publish it when we do.

Name: Tania Edwards
Party: Conservative

1. What will I do to bring meaningful improvement to  cycling in Adur, no in the distant future, but soon?

I have only been a Councillor for the last year (and if I am re-elected) I aim to continue working with the Highways and WSCC to get urgent repairs in Southlands as many of the potholes are at risk of reaching Australia and are a serious hazard to all road users!  Parts of Kingston Lane, Wilmot Road, Arundel Close (crater), Middle Road, are now scheduled to be repaired/resurfaced this year – photos sent to them obviously paint a thousand words!

However the above is mainly remedial work and I feel to help add value to Southlands and in order to link up with all the other surrounding Adur districts to have a more cohesive travel plan for all, whether by bike, walking, active travel through good public services and car, we need to have a major restructuring of Stoney Lane, Kingston Lane, Hammy Lane and last but not least Middle Road.  If we can get these roads/links right, I believe we can enhance the experience for all travellers, encouraging more that are physically able to get out and about.  

There are many families living in Southlands, however over 60% of residents are aged 60 yrs plus, there are a large number of people under0 – 60yrs too that have a variety of disabilities and are in specially adapted homes.  As I mention below, my challenge will be to serve all these needs, whilst trying to work closely with other wards as we are slap bang in the middle and therefore need to work together to achieve a cohesive plan.

The answers to many of the issues raised by everyone so far will depend on the same old issues – quality and proposed layouts.  Afterall we have the technology and the know-how, we just need to get on and apply it.

2. What in my ward, or in Adur more widely, are the specific problems, challenges or solutions that I would like to address that would enable more safe easy everyday journeys by bike?

I have addressed part of this already in Question 1.   

I would add:

  • I think that reducing speed restrictions in some areas (which has also been raised by many of the other candidates too) should be considered, some countries e.g. America have brought in ‘dual speed limits’ for areas that have children going to school which apply at certain times of the day (with hefty fines imposed if breached).
  • I think that we need to have a national road training programme and awareness for all road users, however I will settle for getting something up and running in Adur to start with, as in the last 10yrs alone the law has changed on so many fronts with regard to road use e.g. who gives right of way to who and people across all ages/modes of travel have not been keeping up and Covid has added to this problem.  I have seen all ages using all modes of transport and they seem to have lost their confidence and/or are completely oblivious to the dangers as they were vastly reduced when we were all in lockdowns.

3. Do I have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in the coming years?

I would very much like to work to get the buy-in from all on how we use our roads and pavements throughout Adur (and nationally).  To achieve this I think that following any training for all, this will help with accountability which everyone needs to take ownership.   In Amsterdam I have been amazed at how pedestrians, car drivers and bike riders can live in harmony and everyone respects each other as equals, whether this is resulting in bike riders being registered I believe this has helped to give bike users a higher profile and formal recognition. 

Overall it is about working with all parties and authorities and whilst discussions are still needed, more doing is also imperative!

Candidate: Dan Flower
Party: Labour

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

We have had many consultations on cycle lanes. Many good ideas were put forward, but it seems that over the years council officers put forward good ideas only for Conservative councillors to come up with reasons why we should not do them. As a councillor I want to see action, I want to see improvements made.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

In Southlands safe cycling is especially important with the number of school students on their way to and from Shoreham Academy. The county council likes on-line surveys and consultations. That’s not good enough. Ideas for Middle Road and Upper Shoreham Road appear and disappear without anything happening.  As a councillor I will insist on genuine local involvement to bring about change and to ensure safe, active travel becomes an option for local people. How refreshing would it be if we heard from our children about their experiences of cycling and walking to school, from dog walkers about crossing the roads to the parks and from people with pushchairs, wheelchairs and mobility scooters about dropped kerbs.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Transport is the biggest cause of pollution in Adur so I would like to make it easier for people to choose to leave the car behind. It should be easier and safer for local people to cycle to work, to school, to the shops or for leisure. I support more cycle lanes, more places to park cycles in town centres and workplaces, more 20mph speed limit zones and an affordable integrated public transport system. More about the policies I support are on https://www.ewslabour.org.uk/2022/04/14/our-priorities-for-cycling-and-transport-in-adur/

Candidate: Ian Jones
Party: Liberal Democrat

1. What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but
soon?

Now we have the bones of a network we need to facilitate the actual use of bikes. That means more secure parking in town centres, bike storage for residents without garages, and integration with other public transport. If elected, LibDem councillors will use carbon free transport wherever practicable when carrying out their duties. As councillors, we would use the current hike in petrol prices as a rallying cry to encourage more low carbon travel options, including cycling and walking.

2. In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges
or solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy
everyday journeys by bike?

As the fiasco with Upper Shoreham Road demonstrated, cycle schemes are tolerated and begrudgingly adopted by Tory councillors after central government pressure. Cycles are equal and vulnerable road users. There are not enough segregated safe spaces to give cyclists of all levels of experience the confidence to use bikes as everyday transport and exercise. In the past, shared spaces have often been poorly designed and caused friction between users. Cycling will not be an afterthought for LibDem councillors.

3. Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable
transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district
grows in coming years?

We will create a cyclists’ Adur Ring. It will link the Coastal Path, Downs Link and South Downs Way. It will be a marked and branded circuit that will link the beach to the Downs and the river. It will provide a cycling link between Shoreham and Southwick as well as a link northward to Steyning. It will provide an opportunity for more residents to use bikes to travel safely between local towns. It will be a fabulous accessible recreation facility and another amenity to attract visitors. We shall be doing more work on the precise route of the Adur Ring and, in due course, will publish details on Facebook
@FocusonShorehamandSouthwick.

Candidate: Anne Younger
Party: Green Party

What will you do to bring meaningful improvement to cycling in Adur, not in the distant future, but soon?

Like so many of us I walk, cycle and drive a car, to be honest, not necessarily in that order! Nobody should be made ill, to feel guilty or unsafe doing any of those, but sadly they do. As a Green candidate I know that it could be so much better if we are brave, willing to see other perspectives and open ourselves to change. It is going to be the only way we survive as a race.

I would bring energy, drive and an absolute conviction to a whole range of ideas aimed at improving cycling and active travel, starting on day one. Above all I would look at things differently, putting our health and that of the planet first – because we depend on it (oh and it is very beautiful).

Despite the oft-quoted opinion that the County Council have all the power when it comes to improving active travel, Adur District DOES have some rights and jurisdiction. It would be my priority to push to use these to make early changes to our local roads and infrastructure – a great example being where I live and where I am standing as candidate – Middle Road in Southlands ward.

In your ward, or in Adur more widely, what specific problems, challenges or
solutions would you like to address that would enable more safe, easy everyday journeys by bike?

Use Adur District’s local powers to make Middle Road safer for school children and all other users by providing cycling infrastructure.

Give support to a motion for a 20mph speed limit for all residential areas of Shoreham and throughout the district, improving safety significantly for cyclists & pedestrians, at low cost.

Back the campaign to develop infrastructure for the Upper Shoreham Road and A259 which is designed to the best specifications and creates a safe artery for cyclists, pedestrians, and mobility vehicles.

Support extension of cycle share schemes into the Adur area.

With local stakeholders, develop a blueprint for effective cycling arteries throughout the district – east to west and north to south.

Scrutinise planning applications to ensure that cyclist provision and infrastructure is a key component within any new build.

Lobby for ‘before and after’ school road closure schemes at local schools (eg. St Peter’s, St Nicolas and St Mary, Shoreham Academy)

Do you have any other ambitions for cycling or other forms of sustainable
transport in Shoreham and Adur, particularly as the population of our district grows in coming years?

Besides active travel, other keys to easing the move away from the car are to provide well planned public transport services – rail and road, and to have a shared vision for revitalising and localising our urban spaces. I would support/ lobby for the following:

Station–town-river-sea pedestrianisation via Brunswick Road, East Street, footbridge, Ferry Road.

Given the development of the New Monks Farm area, to lobby for an A27 limited bus service to provide a ‘northern public transport artery’ to the district.

Lobby for bus lane infrastructure on the A259 to increase the efficiency/reliability of the Stagecoach 700 service between Worthing and Brighton.

Lobby for improvement to bus services north of the Upper Shoreham Road including frequency and timing of the Compass 19 service.

Lobby for ticket integration between companies – Stagecoach/Compass/Brighton & Hove – to minimise multiple tickets over extended journeys.

Lobby for extension of Car Share schemes into the Adur area. Car clubs reduce private car ownership and congestion. Ensure all new developments have ‘Car Club’ parking provision.

Lobby with Southern Rail to improve the capacity and frequency of West Coastway services. This is an essential public travel artery and services should include larger, more frequent trains.

Thanks to fellow Green candidate Julian Shinn for many of these suggestions.

.