WSCC’s July consultation: What do we think?

As the next stage in West Sussex’s consultation process for Shoreham, an online survey is about to come to an end – allowing local people to express their thoughts on new proposals for improvements to streets.

If you live in, live near, or travel through Shoreham, and you haven’t yet participated, the deadline is stated as Sunday 1 August – but we don’t know whether submissions close at the start or the end of the day, so our advice is to ensure you complete your survey by the end of of Saturday 31 July.

What’s on offer?

After a good response to March’s initial engagement, West Sussex County Council has moved forward with a choice of two outline designs for Upper Shoreham Road, as well as some initial ideas for the Middle Road area.

The proposal is NOT to return to the temporary orange plastic wands we saw last winter. Instead, plans involve good design, attractive changes and layouts that retain space for parking cars.

The big question: One-way or two-way?

WSCC would like to know your thoughts on whether Upper Shoreham Road would best be served by a single two-way cycletrack on the south side of the street, or a pair of one-way tracks – one on each side.

Our firm recommendation is for the ‘one way, both sides’ option.
It is simpler to understand – particularly when driving. Here we explain more:

Other things you may want to consider in your response to the proposals:

  • Rather than squeezing past the Amsterdam pub, should St Nicolas Lane be used to create a better connection to a proposed new crossing over the A283 Steyning Road?
  • Are there enough pedestrian crossings? Walking is important as well as cycling – so should the number of crossings be increased to reflect this?
  • Also with walking in mind, should the very wide entrances to some side-turnings be adjusted to make them easier to cross?

Proposals for Middle Road / Eastern Avenue area

WSCC is also looking for your thoughts on what kind of measures might improve safety for journeys in the area around Middle Road.

Our thoughts on these:

  • It’s good to see ideas like continuous footways, traffic filters and School Streets being considered, but…
  • The measures on the WSCC map may not be in the best-chosen locations to address problems.
  • Three key roads, Middle Road, Eastern Avenue and Stoney Lane, appear unimproved by the proposals.
  • Stoney Lane in particular needs changes, to address problems at the start and the end of the school day. It may benefit from becoming a School Street.

Whatever your preferences, you don’t have long to participate. Complete the survey NOW – and tell your friends.

Shoreham improvements: tell WSCC what you think

More consultation?

West Sussex County Council is holding another consultation on improvements for Shoreham.

Here’s why:

The council’s last engagement, in March, helped them gauge the appetite among local people for change. And around two-thirds gave a clear “Yes please!”

Let’s look at the detail

Now it’s time to look at details: specific ideas and possibilities to make two main areas easier and safer for getting around by bike, and on foot:

  • Upper Shoreham Road (as a key strategic cross-Shoreham route)
  • Middle Road, Eastern Avenue and surrounding areas (important due to schooltime traffic in particular)

Even if you’ve already completed WSCC’s engagement in March, it’s important to participate in this consultation now – to help move ideas forward.

How about money?

Isn’t there a risk that Department for Transport funding won’t be available? It’s true that DfT funding is currently looking uncertain, but WSCC is continuing with the important task of consultation and design, to ensure that when funds are available, projects are ready to build.

Have your say

So: Take a look at these important ideas. See what you like, and what you don’t. Consider the aspects you like, and the parts you feel should be different. Then complete the survey to tell WSCC what you think.

The biggest question

There are many details for you to consider, but one of the most important questions is: “Should Upper Shoreham Road feature a single two-way cycle track, or a pair of one-way cycle tracks, one on each side of the road?”

Our recommendation on this is that a PAIR OF ONE-WAY CYCLE TRACKS offers the best design for Upper Shoreham Road – easier, simpler and safer whether you’re cycling or driving.

Take a look

Any questions, just let us know, but put the kettle on, and take a look now at WSCC’s ideas for improving travel in Shoreham.

Westminster tells WSCC that it cannot apply for Shoreham funds

The journey towards better cycling and walking in Shoreham by Sea often feels like a case of ‘two steps forward, one step back’. And there has been a significant setback.

West Sussex County Council’s current programme of consultation – with its strong evidence of public opinion – has been focussed on readying a bid for what’s called ‘Tranche 3’ of the Department for Transport’s Active Travel Fund. But WSCC may now be ineligible to even bid for such funding.

Tranche 1 of the ATF, in 2020, was provided to fund emergency, temporary schemes to help us all adapt our travel habits during the most difficult time of the pandemic. Tranche 3 is designed to provide lasting, serious well-designed change that enables cycling and walking in the long term.

Here’s the catch:

The Department for Transport has written to West Sussex County Council to say that, because of the way the council handled its Tranche 1 projects (including the temporary lanes on Upper Shoreham Road) it is now ineligible to apply for Tranche 3 – the funding which could bring long-term improvements to Shoreham.

This is harsh

It’s no secret that WSCC could have made a better job of last winter’s temporary schemes across the county. They were all removed before they’d had a chance to settle in, rather than being carefully tested and adjusted. We can’t speak for other towns like Worthing and Chichester, but it was clear that in Shoreham, there was a case for tweaking, adapting, and allowing a matter of months – at least – for the full benefit of the experimental ‘Tranche 1’ lanes to be realised.

This mistake was noticed by several of Shoreham’s county councillors, who ‘called in’ the decision to prematurely remove the lanes. A WSCC scrutiny committee voted 6-2 that this decision deserved reconsideration, but the then Cabinet Member for Highways and Infrastructure – Cllr Roger Elkins – stuck to his guns – and the lanes – carrying hugely boosted numbers of Shoreham people on their journeys – were removed.

Since then, lots has changed. WSCC, recognising the shifting tide of positive opinion towards active travel, has begun a very thorough programme of consultation – the most recent stage of which has shown a 67% level of support for positive changes to selected streets.

At WSCC, there is a new Cabinet Member for Highways and Transport – Cllr Joy Dennis – who appears to recognise the opportunities on offer and the need to improve walking and cycling across West Sussex.

But ultimately, the decision to deprive West Sussex of much-needed funding has been taken in Westminster – not in Chichester.

What can we do?

We are writing to the Department for Transport, explaining the impact of this decision, and asking that WSCC is at least allowed to submit its Tranche 3 bid for consideration.

We have spoken to our MP, Tim Loughton, who shares our disappointment, and who is also writing to DfT ministers.

And we continue to speak to WSCC councillors and officers – all of whom seem determined to apply thorough consultation and high-quality decision-making to really move Shoreham (and the whole county) in the right direction.

What can you do?

These are frustrating times. But the game is not up. Another round of consultation – more detailed than before – is coming soon. Please participate in this. We’ll share details when they’re available.

And writing to your county councillor – and to Shoreham’s MP – will help demonstrate the strength of feeling that exists within Shoreham’s community – that the people in our increasingly busy town deserve better choices in how they travel – and that we need well-designed streets to make this a reality.

WSCC publishes its Shoreham engagement report – and it’s good news

As part of its commitment to thorough consultation on the future of cycling and walking in Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex County Council recently asked the people of Shoreham for their thoughts on what’s needed to create streets truly fit for getting around by bike and by foot.

An engagement was conducted between 6 and 26 March. Following the (successful, but sadly shortlived) temporary cycle lanes of last winter, Upper Shoreham Road was a key focus of the engagement, alongside questions regarding areas like Middle Road and Eastern Avenue, and the chance for residents and travellers to pin their thoughts to a map, building a detailed picture of local concerns.

WSCC’s report on the engagement has just been published.
You can view the full report, but here are our highlights…

  • 68% of people responding to the questions supported improvements to walking and cycling in Shoreham (this figure is similar to that noted in other recent surveys, such as those conducted by Tim Loughton MP and by the Shoreham Society)
  • So, for every one respondent opposing improving walking and cycling on Upper Shoreham Road there were more than two supporting improvements.
  • Looking at options for Upper Shoreham Road, a permanent one way cycle lane on each side of the road proved more popular than the idea of a two-way route on just one side. (This reflects government design guidance for residential streets like Upper Shoreham Road.)
  • 74% of people indicated support for a crossing on Steyning Road by the Red Lion pub.
  • 68% of people supported reducing the speed of traffic in Middle Road and Eastern Avenue.
  • 66% supported changing the layout of Middle Road and Eastern Avenue to make them safer for walking and cycling
Our visualisation of how cycle facilities could look on Upper Shoreham Road.

So, with a good level of support shown for moving forward, what happens next?

Next up is another round of WSCC consultation – this one more detailed. We’re expecting to see different design options made available for comment. This consultation is planned to run between 5 July and 1 August – ready for WSCC to bid for a new wave of Department for Transport Active Travel funding.

We’ll share more details as soon as they’re available.

The Department for Transport’s Active Travel Fun video – featuring Shoreham!

Our questions for candidates: the Conservatives respond

With local elections coming soon, we have offered four questions to parties and candidates standing for West Sussex County Council and Adur District Council.

Here are the responses we have received from East Worthing and Shoreham Conservatives

Our question: In recent years, the people of Shoreham have experienced a growing dependence on cars as a default means of transport – even for short journeys. New housing developments look to bring more challenges for congestion and air pollution. How do you see the future of transport in our town? What changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably?

The Conservatives respond…

“We are well aware of this issue and the impact on our health and well-being from both lack of exercise and the pollution created by transport. Adur was one of the first districts in West Sussex to approve a Local Walking and Cycling Plan, which was developed in consultation with many groups, to increase active travel and we are now taking every opportunity to implement that in further consultation with our community.  This action includes receiving a £250,000 grant from the government to develop a proposal along the Upper Shoreham Road, including a safe crossing over the Steyning Road, and nearby roads to create segregated cycling and safer routes to our two senior schools, Shoreham Academy and Sir Robert Woodard Academy.  For new developments, those along Shoreham Harbour are required to make space for a new cycle lane into Brighton as well as provide a shared car club and New Monks Farm/A27 to provide a safe walking and cycle route to link Shoreham up to Lancing and the Sir Robert Woodard Academy.  New Monks Farm will have a dedicated access route that can only be used by walkers, cyclists and public transport. Any new residential and commercial build has to have safe cycle storage and provision for EV charging.

“We are working with Worthing Borough and Brighton and Hove Councils to implement an innovative bike sharing scheme which will provide electric bikes as well as those requiring slightly more effort.  This will not only be useful for our community but it will also put Shoreham on the tourist map to help support our local businesses.

“Segregated cycling schemes are appropriate for key strategic routes but we need to ensure everyone feels safe on all our roads whether walking, cycling or driving so we will continue to promote and assist walking, cycling and public transport to reduce substantially the reliance on cars.  This policy will create more space on our roads for users who have to drive.”


Our question: Between district and county councils, there are many policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure. Though many councillors express support or sympathy for the cause of improving sustainable transport, an appetite for actual change is sometimes harder to find. Alongside the crucial task of listening to local people, what are your thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas?

The Conservatives respond:

“The government has published world leading and exciting policies on carbon neutrality and sustainable and active travel.  As local councillors we have to listen so we can effectively represent and to take the lead on implementing that policy so that it best serves our community.  Last year Tim Loughton and Kevin Boram held a consultation exercise, which received 1,400 responses, on cycle routes around Shoreham. In addition this year West Sussex County Council held a further consultation on proposals for Upper Shoreham Road and other routes. We also fight for our community. Kevin received overwhelming support from a scrutiny committee against a decision made by West Sussex County Council on cycle lanes in Shoreham. Without that action Kevin would not have received the £250,000 to develop permanent cycle schemes.

“The Conservatives are not scared of taking bold initiatives to protect your environment.  As an example, the purchase of New Salts Farm and Pads Farm by Adur District Council will protect that land from further development will enable us to improve local wildlife habitat including providing rare intertidal and estuarial zones.”


Our question: Certain measures are recognised as ways to create safety and choice on our streets, by improving conditions for people choosing to walk or cycle. What are your thoughts on options like these?
• A network of high quality separated cycle routes reaching every part of Shoreham
• ‘School streets’, where areas outside schools are closed to traffic at the start and end of the school day
• 20 mph areas, reducing danger by lowering vehicle speeds in residential streets
• Reducing excessive traffic in selected residential streets by installing filters that allow pedestrians, cycles, emergency services and buses through, while limiting other vehicles to access only.

The Conservatives respond:

“Shoreham has changed significantly since the last in-depth study was completed on road use within the town. The Adur Local Plan is creating much needed housing and business space to create a sustainable community, not only financially but environmentally.  We will fight for a full road strategy review for Shoreham so that we can deliver transport schemes fit for our community and its future. All of the solutions above are great and the Conservatives fully support them in the right place.  Too many schemes implemented by other councils have had an overall adverse effect on the community. We need to ensure that Shoreham is a great and sustainable place for all to live and work.”


Our question: What other ideas do you have for transport in and around Shoreham and Adur?

The Conservatives respond:

“The way we live and work is changing rapidly, not only as a result of the impact of technology but also to deliver our carbon commitments to create a sustainable town to protect our future. We are committed to providing green and sustainable jobs, a vibrant and financially sustainable High Street and business sector and to protect and improve our natural and built environments.  Communities consist of many interrelated activities and cycling is important, but it is only a part of the holistic view we need to take to deliver that sustainable future. This includes interconnected public transport, EV charging points, as well as safe cycling routes and facilities that every-one feels safe to use whatever the time of day.”



Our questions for candidates: Labour responds

With local elections coming soon, we have offered four questions to parties and candidates standing for Adur District Council and West Sussex County Council.

Here are the responses we have received from East Worthing and Shoreham Labour Party…

Labour begins:

“In our election statement What Labour stands for in Adur we voice our support for “safe cycle routes – designed and planned with the community”.”

“Your questions are very Shoreham-centred, not surprisingly as you are Shoreham-By-Cycle! We have candidates who wish to represent all wards of Adur District Council and local county council divisions. All support improvements that will make it easier and safer for people to access spaces and get around with a choice to walk or cycle.

“We believe these choices must be available to people who are young, old, individuals or families, children going to school, adults going to work and for those with a physical disability.

Our question: In recent years, the people of Shoreham have experienced a growing dependence on cars as a default means of transport – even for short journeys. New housing developments look to bring more challenges for congestion and air pollution. How do you see the future of transport in our town? What changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably?

“In question 1 you ask about new housing developments and what changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably.

“We believe any new development should be of a scale that does not damage our environment or the local infrastructure. Any development over a certain size must offer additional infrastructure whether that be health services, schools, community open spaces or cycle routes and bus services. We support the creation of and better linking of safe pedestrian and cycle routes to schools, town centres and the sea, and improved, zero-emission, local public transport. At a county level we support clean school transport and an integrated travel system with, for example, interchangeable tickets across trains and buses, and better rural and suburban bus routes with subsidies restored.

Our question: Between district and county councils, there are many policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure. Though many councillors express support or sympathy for the cause of improving sustainable transport, an appetite for actual change is sometimes harder to find. Alongside the crucial task of listening to local people, what are your thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas?

Labour responds:

“In question 2 you point out there is no shortage of district and country council policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure and you ask for our thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas.

“Adur is not well served by the current county and district council leaderships who talk a lot but do little to support walking and cycling. West Sussex County Council has started to charge for Bikeability courses in schools; we would reverse this decision. We are committed to listening to our communities and responding to their needs; taking advice and looking at the evidence on the effectiveness of different approaches. That means standing up for innovations and replicating best practice of other councils to improve the well-being of our communities.”

Our question: Certain measures are recognised as ways to create safety and choice on our streets, by improving conditions for people choosing to walk or cycle. What are your thoughts on options like these?
• A network of high quality separated cycle routes reaching every part of Shoreham
• ‘School streets’, where areas outside schools are closed to traffic at the start and end of the school day
• 20 mph areas, reducing danger by lowering vehicle speeds in residential streets
• Reducing excessive traffic in selected residential streets by installing filters that allow pedestrians, cycles, emergency services and buses through, while limiting other vehicles to access only.

Labour responds:

“In question 3 you ask our views on a range of initiatives from school streets, through 20mph zones to filters allowing only some forms of transport into a given street. We would like to see plans and action, not simply for a single street, but for zones and the larger area; looking at how cycle and pedestrian routes can be created and improved; how motor traffic in streets used as rat-runs can be re-routed or limited and creating school streets where possible for certain periods to increase safety and air quality. Each of the initiatives you list has merit, as do low traffic neighbourhoods, in the right places, but will be most effective as part a thought-through plan for our streets. We support a network of separated cycle routes in Shoreham, and in other parts of Adur too.

“We support the introduction of a bike hire scheme.

“One of our commitments is to improve and regenerate local centres. That would include looking at improved cycle parking and routes to and from centres and more pedestrianised areas. Improved signage for town centre car parking, as suggested by local traders could also help to reduce motor traffic.

“All of the initiatives you list are already in place in other parts of this country and further afield. The evidence for their effectiveness and how they can be best used is clear and tested. We do not think there is a need for delay in coming forward with plans and action at county or district council level.”

Our questions for candidates: Liberal Democrats respond

With local elections coming soon, we have offered four questions to parties and candidates standing for WSCC and ADC.

Here are the responses we have received from Shoreham and Southwick Liberal Democrats

Our question: In recent years, the people of Shoreham have experienced a growing dependence on cars as a default means of transport – even for short journeys. New housing developments look to bring more challenges for congestion and air pollution. How do you see the future of transport in our town? What changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably?

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“This is a really good question. I would like to see the introduction of more cycle lanes. New cycle lanes should integrate with the current road layout and Shoreham-By-Cycle has provided some excellent mock-ups of how they could look once implemented. They should, of course, be implemented following a consultation with local residents. By having an infrastructure friendly to bikes, it will allow more people to make short journeys by bike and remove the dependency on cars.

“I would want to see ALL new-builds have an electric charge point for electric vehicles included. This shouldn’t be an afterthought – this should be part of the initial design. By having an electrical charge point people can think about buying an electric car without having to worry about additional costs relating to the installation of a charging point.

“It would be great to convert the taxi stand to a wireless charging platform so whilst taxis are waiting for fares they are also charging. This would minimise pollution and also move taxis over to be electric. They are trialling this in Nottingham (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-51140689)

“I also want to see pavements being prioritised over roads at junctions. If you take the Netherlands as an example, you can see that it is cars that need to slow down at junctions and not people for cars. (https://departmentfortransport.wordpress.com/2012/08/21/continuous-paths-across-minor-junctions/)

“I would like to see more areas pedestrianised. The pedestrianised areas minimise traffic whilst allowing people to walk around Shoreham without the fear of traffic. The areas also allow cafés and restaurants to provide more outdoor space and rejuvenate our High Street. I also want to see more mature trees planted along the High Street and the A259 to help combat air pollution but also to provide more greenery to the centre of town.”

Our question: Between district and county councils, there are many policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure. Though many councillors express support or sympathy for the cause of improving sustainable transport, an appetite for actual change is sometimes harder to find. Alongside the crucial task of listening to local people, what are your thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas?

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“I believe as councillors we should be acting as intermediaries between people for and against a project. In order for a project to be more appealing, I think it needs to be carried out following a number of criteria:

“People need to be included in the consultation, design and decision-making process. By being part of the process, there will be greater acceptance to change.

“The changes need to show that they will be beneficial to the people being impacted but also to the wider community. People care less about the cost of a project or how much money it will save. They want to know how it will improve their lives.”

Our question: Certain measures are recognised as ways to create safety and choice on our streets, by improving conditions for people choosing to walk or cycle. What are your thoughts on options like these?

  • A network of high-quality separated cycle routes reaching every part of Shoreham.

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“Totally agree with this concept.”

  • ‘School streets’, where areas outside schools are closed to traffic at the start and end of the school day.

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“This could be challenging as some parents may need to use the car to take their children either because they live further afield or they are dropping off their children on the way to work. I think this would need to be investigated in more depth.”

  • 20 mph areas, reducing danger by lowering vehicle speeds in residential streets

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“Another great idea. This would help minimise risk of accidents and eventual fatalities. Better for the environment.”

  • Reducing excessive traffic in selected residential streets by installing filters that allow pedestrians, cycles, emergency services and buses through, while limiting other vehicles to access only.

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“This is a good idea and could integrate with my proposal for the continuous paths as in The Netherlands.”

Our question: What other ideas do you have for transport in and around Shoreham and Adur?

The Liberal Democrats respond:

“I think I have shared most of my ideas under question 1.”

Ian Jones makes the following additional comment:

“To support cycle lanes, a more realistic appreciation of the costs involved is required. The USR cycle lane would require proper curbing for segregation and perhaps lights on the Holmbush roundabout. Painting a few lines and planting orange rubber poles was a somewhat underwhelming way to spend the grant monies.”

David Batchelor provides this additional analysis:

“The questions are around two themes:

  • the quality of non-car infrastructure 
  • reducing dependence on owned cars 

“It is not about pedestrians versus car versus bikes. As the USR temporary cycle lane debacle showed, bad/zero thought and design is bad for everybody and causes friction and failure. Contrast that with Steine Gardens to the level in Brighton where there is a brilliantly thought-out scheme where cycles, pedestrians and cars live side-by-side – just brilliant.

“Shoreham is largely flat with multiple east-west routes for which we can, with more thought than money, create an environment.

“Dependence on cars – you need next-level commitment to go car free. Most of us just can’t do that. What we can do is take practical steps to give everyone options:

  • “We have bike rental schemes in Worthing and Brighton – we are in the middle of both let’s encourage them to embrace Shoreham.
  • “Car clubs – yeah, parking is a mare in Shoreham, but how many cars are a rarely-used first or second car. If we actively encourage car clubs – using the Pond Street car park as a base – that would provide options. Many second cars could go, as would the occasional sole-car user.

“Let’s do some work on the Shoreham to Bramber section of the Downs Link. We can easily separate out bike and pedestrians to make it better for all. “

Answers drafted by:

Nico Kearns (WSCC candidate for Shoreham North and Adur candidate for Southlands)

with support from:

Ian Jones (WSCC candidate for Southwick and Adur candidate for Southwick Green)

Neville Pressley (WSCC candidate for Shoreham South and Adur candidate for St Mary’s)

David Batchelor (Adur candidate for Buckingham)

Our questions for candidates: The Green Party responds

With local elections coming soon, we have offered four questions to parties and candidates.

Here are the responses we have received from Adur Green Party…

Our question: In recent years, the people of Shoreham have experienced a growing dependence on cars as a default means of transport – even for short journeys. New housing developments look to bring more challenges for congestion and air pollution. How do you see the future of transport in our town? What changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably? 

The Green Party responds:

“Safe walking and cycling routes from our homes to key destinations, such as workplaces, schools, shops, parks, train station.  

“Using the responses to the previous 5 travel surveys (LCWIP etc) to create properly integrated walking routes and cycle lanes along USR, Middle road and eventually the A259 coast road. These must take account of drivers’ needs and the views of people who live on these roads. Good design which allows residents to access their properties whilst providing safe routes for children, older folks and inexperienced cyclists can bring about significant changes in rates of bike journeys and help reduce traffic and air pollution. Not everyone can cycle everywhere. But many people can cycle somewhere! 

“School streets to keep kids and parents safe on the school run, reduce road rage and congestion near schools, reduce air pollution which disproportionately impacts developing lungs and leads to increased incidence of childhood asthma and other respiratory conditions.

“20 is plenty zone in the little side streets in the heart of Shoreham-by-sea and residential streets where residents want this. Reduce the speed limit on the A283 Steyning road (from National speed limit to 30 mph) from the roundabout under the A27 flyover to the Red Lion.

“More effective traffic management to reduce speeding, ease congestion, improve air quality. Enforce the restriction preventing aggregates lorries and Port traffic from using the A283 Old Shoreham road and the A259 High Street. 

“Safe road crossings at key points e.g from the Red Lion to the Downs link. And mid way between the Swiss Cottage and Amsterdam where there’s access to the river but no safe crossing for pedestrians, school children, residents or elderly people. These safe crossings enable dog walkers, family groups, people in wheel chairs and those on bike rides to cross directly from Connaught Avenue leading from the station or from North Shoreham to the river side. Then to continue on over the Toll bridge to Lancing and Worthing or up on to the Downs. 

“Rethink parking.  

“Many more people are having goods and groceries delivered. Safe parking needs to be planned so drop offs don’t cause hold-ups

“Designated disabled parking on the high Street so people with very limited mobility can readily access town centre shops, cafes, pubs and restaurants. 

“Level access or ramped routes from the Riverside walk into Ropetackle North. And from the new flood defences alongside the airport down to Cecil Pashley Way. This is necessary for people on mobility scooters, parents with buggies and people on bikes. 

“Open the underpass/subway at the station! 

“Enforce pavement parking bans to make getting around easier and safer for pedestrians and wheeled users. “

Our question:  Between district and county councils, there are many policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure. Though many councillors express support or sympathy for the cause of improving sustainable transport, an appetite for actual change is sometimes harder to find. Alongside the crucial task of listening to local people, what are your thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas? 

The Green Party responds:

“Raising new ideas, introducing better approaches to break down the same old-same old ways of doing things. Modelling the change we want to see by, for example, walking and cycling to council meetings. Inviting experts or people with success stories from other areas to share their experiences to inspire and motivate change. E.g let’s hear from the designers of the mini Holland scheme in Walthamstow. Or from successfully implemented school streets groups in Brighton.”

 Our question: Certain measures are recognised as ways to create safety and choice on our streets, by improving conditions for people choosing to walk or cycle. What are your thoughts on options like these? 


• A network of high quality separated cycle routes reaching every part of Shoreham 

The Green Party responds:

“LCWIP has identified primary and secondary routes. The primary routes are mainly East-West along A270, Middle road and A259. The secondary routes are North-South. Each route requires a different style of solution and will need to be handled thoughtfully. Following the recent consultation the development of at least one of these routes should be completed within a year. 

“If the infrastructure is there then people will use it. Without high quality, segregated routes people who are not accomplished cyclists may feel intimidated. It is only once the routes have been in place for about 18 months that we will be able to evaluate their effectiveness and improve the small details. It should be expected that there will be some initial resistance from some stakeholders but councillors and staff must be prepared to make bold decisions for the long term sustainability of transport options.”

 
• ‘School streets’, where areas outside schools are closed to traffic at the start and end of the school day 

The Green Party responds:

“Shoreham Academy Stoney Lane entrance, St Peter’s Sullington Way, the Beach Primary and Swiss Gardens Primary on Swiss Gardens, are ideal schools to develop school streets proposals. Post pandemic we need to take air pollution seriously to keep the population in better respiratory health in case of another covid wave. School streets are a primary way of addressing children’s health and safety.”

 
• 20 mph areas, reducing danger by lowering vehicle speeds in residential streets 

The Green Party responds:

“Essential for all our well-being. I Live on a road which is always congested from 7-9.30 a.m and 4-6 p.m plus every sunny weekend or holiday. It was extraordinary to witness the improved quality of life during Lockdown 1 when traffic became virtually non-existent. Speeding cars create noise, danger and poor air quality. These prevent the formation of strong neighbourhood relationships. Re routing traffic onto primary routes, reducing the need for people to drive by providing safe and affordable alternative ways of getting around can reduce rat running and congestion.”


• Reducing excessive traffic in selected residential streets by installing filters that allow pedestrians, cycles, emergency services and buses through, while limiting other vehicles to access only

The Green Party responds:

“Modal filters are a great idea but must be well designed. The people who live directly at the point of the filter will need regular info and discussion during the design and development phase to enable them to see how things will work for them and to understand the possible wider benefits for their community. Not everyone will like everything and the planners and politicians need to accept this.”
  
Our question: What other ideas do you have for transport in and around Shoreham and Adur? 

The Green Party responds:

“In West Street prevent right turns at the High Street end. Left turns only would stop much rat running and reduce hold ups on the eastbound lane from the roundabout. 

“Introduce a car club at each new build apartment block. 

“Extend the Brighton Bike scheme into Shoreham and Lancing. 

“The current rail line is to the South of the developed coastal strip. The coastal route is served by the 700. But there are poor and expensive public transport options along a northern route. An express bus route or driverless light rail or tram service along the A27 between Brighton and Worthing could take many commuters and children traveling to schools and colleges out of cars. This would need significant vision from DfT and Highways England and is outside of the scope of Adur District Council. “

Local elections 2021: Our questions for candidates

On 6 May 2021, local elections will enable the people of Shoreham to select preferred candidates for a raft of important posts:
West Sussex County Council – all seats are up for election , including two in Shoreham, two in Lancing and one in Southwick.
Adur District Council – half of all seats are up for election
Sussex Police and Crime Commisioner – up for election

The role of local democracy is vital in working towards safe streets and easier, more convenient infrastructure that enables the choice of cycling for everyday journeys. WSCC has the crucial responsibility for highways and infrastructure, while ADC controls decisions around planning and other local matters.

JUMP STRAIGHT TO RESPONSES…
Labour
Green
Liberal Democrats
Conservatives

For district and county council candidates, we offer the following questions, to help us all better understand their positions on transport in and around Shoreham. We invite candidates’ responses, which we will share publicly, to help the people of Shoreham with their voting decisions…

1. In recent years, the people of Shoreham have experienced a growing dependence on cars as a default means of transport – even for short journeys. New housing developments look to bring more challenges for congestion and air pollution. How do you see the future of transport in our town? What changes need to happen in order for people to feel they have more choices for getting around safely and sustainably?


2. Between district and county councils, there are many policies, strategies and consultation reports describing a need for cycle infrastructure. Though many councillors express support or sympathy for the cause of improving sustainable transport, an appetite for actual change is sometimes harder to find. Alongside the crucial task of listening to local people, what are your thoughts on the role of councillors as leaders, helping us to consider new, perhaps unfamiliar, ideas?


3. Certain measures are recognised as ways to create safety and choice on our streets, by improving conditions for people choosing to walk or cycle. What are your thoughts on options like these?
• A network of high quality separated cycle routes reaching every part of Shoreham
• ‘School streets’, where areas outside schools are closed to traffic at the start and end of the school day
• 20 mph areas, reducing danger by lowering vehicle speeds in residential streets
• Reducing excessive traffic in selected residential streets by installing filters that allow pedestrians, cycles, emergency services and buses through, while limiting other vehicles to access only.
 
4. What other ideas do you have for transport in and around Shoreham and Adur?

If you are a candidate in the elections, feel free to respond to us by email to shorehambycycle@gmail.com, or as a comment on this post. We will share your answers with the public.

SEE RESPONSES FROM…
Conservatives
Liberal Democrats
Green
Labour

Let’s talk about Middle Road

This important street needs improvement, but should not be seen as a simple diversion to placate critics of an Upper Shoreham Road cycle route.

In the current WSCC consultation on cycling and walking, Upper Shoreham Road occupies the bulk of the conversation – with good reason, seeing as it’s been identified several times as primary route in a future cycle network.



But Upper Shoreham Road is not the only street that’s mentioned in WSCC’s engagement. Eastern Avenue and Middle Road, considered until now as secondary routes, both get mentions.

Should Eastern Avenue and Middle Road be made better for walking and cycling?

Absolutely. We’ve said for years that Middle Road, as it stands, functions poorly. At school times in particular, it becomes congested and dangerous. Thousands of children use Middle Road to reach Shoreham Academy, and there’s an uneasy, sometimes dangerous, tension between people travelling by car, foot and bike. We’ve worked hard with Councillor Debs Stainforth, trying to persuade WSCC to make simple improvements, but we’ve been unsuccessful.



Should Middle Road be considered an alternative route to the full length of Upper Shoreham Road?

No. Middle Road deserves change, but so does Upper Shoreham Road – for different reasons. Upper Shoreham Road connects together shops, medical facilities, parks and thousands of homes. Every strategic study into transport in Shoreham identifies the full length of Upper Shoreham Road as a key part of a future cycle network. It wouldn’t be right to dodge this necessary task by simply trying to push it south.

Is there space for a cycleway on Middle Road and Eastern Avenue?

Very good question. But this is where it gets tricky. Middle Road is a very different kind of road to Upper Shoreham Road. Fully separated facilities for cycling, along with good space for walking, would mean a reduction in driving space – or maybe even a stop to using Middle Road as a through driving route (for part of the day, at least). Measures like this might be needed, but they may be difficult, they may be unpopular, and they deserve careful consideration. New Department for Transport design and funding rules won’t allow for half-hearted bodges.

So, our advice:

Yes, let’s identify Middle Road (and the connecting Eastern Avenue) as spaces to improve in future. But let’s NOT let them distract us from Upper Shoreham Road – which needs a high quality, safe cycle route from end to end.

Make your feelings known to WSCC now by using its survey and mapping tool.