Upper Shoreham Road: Frequently asked questions

Why is cycle infrastructure needed on Upper Shoreham Road?

We need safer streets to enable more, safer cycle journeys in our towns. The Department for Transport has made clear that the streets to prioritise are direct, useful, busy streets that move people efficiently to where they need to go. These streets should be updated with separated cycleways, compliant with DfT’s new design standards.

Upper Shoreham Road is arguably the most useful road in Shoreham, connecting thousands of homes to many schools, three shopping areas, a large park, and links east and west towards neighbouring towns.

Upper Shoreham Road was first documented as a key part of a future cycle network around 30 years ago, in a West Sussex County Council strategy document. This has been echoed in multiple plans and strategies, including several by Adur District Council – most recently in Adur & Worthing Councils’ Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan.

Every time any plan or strategy is produced for Adur district, Upper Shoreham Road is identified as a primary route.

Adur and Worthing Councils’ Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan shows Upper Shoreham Road as a primary route in need of change.

How will a cycle scheme improve safety on Upper Shoreham Road?

Upper Shoreham Road does not have a good safety record. Records show that collisions, incidents and related reports are commonplace.

Map by Sussex Safer Roads Partnership, showing reports of incidents on Upper Shoreham Road

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the scheme improving safety for all road users. Drivers, cyclists and pedestrians:

“The minimum lane width is 3m which would result in a major change to the feel of the road, making it feel more like an urban distributer road and Active Travel corridor than an ex- trunk road from the 1960s. The provision of a consistent width would have a traffic calming effect to help to keep driver speeds down and reduce conflict.”

“This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.”

“Any potholes within the scheme extent would also be looked at.”

“The scheme would provide a net safety benefit by providing protection for vulnerable road users such as walkers and cyclists.”

Will enough people use cycleways to make them worthwhile on Upper Shoreham Road?

Data on existing use shows a regular level of cycling on this key route. But the real potential lies in the people who don’t currently feel safe enough to cycle. During 2020’s temporary scheme, Upper Shoreham Road saw a spike in cycling numbers – particularly among children and women.

But experience of long-term street improvements in London and elsewhere shows that when people are enabled to cycle safely, the increase is rarely an overnight one. Instead, numbers build over several months, as confidence, familiarity and habits grow. After two years, the real potential of well-designed cycle infrastructure is witnessed in significant number.

This effect is recognised in the various strategic mapping and planning tools used by engineers and planners. This is why Upper Shoreham Road is repeatedly recognised as a primary route for Shoreham – to be prioritised.

Will cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road help children to get to school?

Yes. West Sussex County Council has carried out a school survey in January 2022 and has looked at travel patterns for the local school. It has shown that Upper Shoreham Road is the most useful road for parents taking their children to all of the junior schools.

Upper Shoreham Road serves five junior schools and two secondary schools – more than any other road in Shoreham. With 200 children a year travelling to Sir Robert Woodard Academy (and this number is forecast to increase), a cycle lane on Upper Shoreham Road will greatly benefit them and all school children.

One of the many children who used temporary lanes to get to school in 2020

Safe journeys to schools rely on two things: reduction of traffic danger on roads close to schools, but, really importantly, safe, separated routes through towns towards school areas. Upper Shoreham Road is vital for this.

Will future cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road be the same as the pop-up cycle lanes?

No. Any proposed cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road will be very different. 2020’s pop-up cycle scheme was installed very quickly, with little time for careful design and without any consultation. A future, permanent scheme will have gone through extensive consultation and design. It will be attractive and will be of a high quality which will enhance the road for all users and residents.

A possible layout and appearance for an improved Upper Shoreham Road

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the proposed new scheme on Upper Shoreham Road:

“[any proposed scheme] would result in a major change to the feel of the road, making it feel more like an urban distributer road and Active Travel corridor than an ex- trunk road from the 1960s. The provision of a consistent width would have a traffic calming effect to help to keep driver speeds down and reduce conflict.”

“This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.”

Will I be able to park my car on Upper Shoreham Road?

Yes. There will still be more than enough car parking spaces. 

A potential future layout for Upper Shoreham Road, showing spaces for car parking.

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the proposed scheme on Upper Shoreham Road:

The level of parking demand has been measured and this information would inform the design as it develops to ensure that the need for on – street parking can be given adequate consideration in each location. This will ensure that parking displacement is minimised.

“A parking survey carried out along Upper Shoreham Road confirmed that there is sufficient parking available along this road which, at most times, remain unoccupied.”

“As part of this cycle scheme, formal parking bays would still be provided except at critical locations where road widths are less than the required highway standard widths and any loss of the total existing parking would be minimal.”

“Any subsequent permanent scheme would be designed to take the need for parking into account.”

“The Council would intend to provide adequate levels of on- street parking within a permanent scheme – hence there would be a reduced need to park in neighbouring roads.” 

“Blue badge parking should remain unaffected. Disabled residents requiring parking outside of their properties should contact the council directly and acquire a blue badge parking permit.” 

What about disabled parking?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about disabled parking on Upper Shoreham Road:

“Blue badge parking should remain unaffected. Disabled residents requiring parking outside of their properties should contact the council directly and acquire a blue badge parking permit.” 

Carefully laid-out parking areas can be part of Upper Shoreham Road’s upgrade.

What about pedestrians? Will walking be improved on Upper Shoreham Road?

Pedestrian crossing points are vital for Upper Shoreham Road, and they will be improved. The current ‘traffic islands’ are not official crossing points, don’t have dropped kerbs, and are not suitable for wheelchair users or parents with buggies. They create dangerous pinch points when drivers overtake people on bikes. They are not fit for purpose. 

Pedestrians crossings must be added to Upper Shoreham Road

Many side roads on Upper Shoreham Road have very wide junctions, creating more danger for people crossing as they walk, and encouraging speed from drivers. Modern design would see these junctions narrowed and made much safer.

There is a benefit to pedestrians (and homeowners) on Upper Shoreham Road in that the moving traffic will be slightly further away from people walking, which has been proven to reduce the pollution that people walking are exposed to.

There is also an added benefit that the vehicle speeds will be reduced on Upper Shoreham Road due to the scheme.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about pedestrian safety on Upper Shoreham Road:

Pedestrian safety has also been considered as part of this scheme. For example, reduced crossing distance at critical junctions, WSCC compliant refuge islands and crossing points have been provided at the desire lines.”

“The existing islands do not have compliant width for pedestrians to stand and wait and therefore have been proposed to be removed. The new refuge islands are wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs and buggies and have been proposed at desire lines i.e., at locations where people are more likely to cross for e.g., near bus stops.”

This active travel scheme would not only make Upper Shoreham Road a safer place for cyclists but would also improve pedestrian safety by reducing pedestrian crossing distances and encouraging slow vehicle speed.


Will the cycle lanes cause congestion or increase driving journey times?

No. The pop-up cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road was tested multiple times and did not impact journey times in any way. Similarly, a permanent scheme should have no impact on journey times. As a two-lane road, there will be no reduction in available driving lanes. No real change for driving along Upper Shoreham Road.

West Sussex County Council montoried journey times when the pop up lanes were in place and this is what they said:

“WSCC Officers conducted several dash-cam recorded and timed drive throughs of the Shoreham (pop up) scheme in response to public concerns about traffic congestion and travel times.

“The mean vehicle speeds through the monitored areas, over a 24-hour period are unchanged by the scheme.”

What about emergency services?

West Sussex County Council consulted all three emergency services throughout the pop-up cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road and they will also be consulted on any future designs and their feedback will be taken into account.

An ambulance making progress through a street with cycle lanes

Here’s what West Sussex County Council said about the pop-up scheme in their report:

We remain in regular contact with all three emergency services and are closely monitoring the impact on blue light services. Although concerns have often been raised by the public regarding emergency vehicles being unable to navigate the scheme at busy periods, this does not reflect the regular feedback from the Emergency Services.”

Will they fix the potholes?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about fixing potholes on Upper Shoreham Road:

“Any potholes within the scheme extent would also be looked at.”

A pothole – to be repaired as part of Upper Shoreham Road improvements

Will cycle lanes cause more pollution?

There is absolutely nothing to suggest that the installation of quality cycleways will cause any increase in pollution. In the long term, it is highly likely to reduce pollution.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about air quality on Upper Shoreham Road when the pop up cycle lanes were in place:

“The pop-up cycle scheme in Shoreham has not materially affected traffic columns and flows, so an increase in pollution is not expected. There is some evidence to suggest more parents and pupils are walking and/or cycling to school, which should positively impact local air quality.”

Will it make it more difficult to get out of driveways?

Good design standards from the Department for Transport provide for easy entrance and exit into and from residents’ driveways.

Here is what West Sussex County Council has said about driveway safety on Upper Shoreham Road:

“The proposed design should have minimal to no effect on the use and access of the existing driveways and properties.”

How many people will use cycleways on Upper Shoreham Road?

Cycle infrastructure is important to help create positive change. Research shows that levels of cycling increase very much in the two years following construction. This increase in cycling numbers is rarely instant, but it does happen.

Nonetheless, when West Sussex County Council installed its 2020 temporary scheme on Upper Shoreham Road, there was a very significant, almost instant increase in numbers, as people felt they could cycle more safely.

WSCC installed traffic monitoring equipment to count the number of cycle trips on Upper Shoreham Road during the time the pop up cycle scheme was in place and for the three months they were in place there were over 30,000 cycle trips recorded.

Usage levels of 2020’s temporary cycle scheme on Upper Shoreham Road

Has there been consultation on this?

West Sussex County Council has carried out extensive consultation on Upper Shoreham Road cycle lanes since 2020. They have consulted the public several times with many surveys and consultations. They have sought the views of emergency services, stakeholders, community groups, businesses and local councillors.

The Department for Transport has written to WSCC to make it very clear that consultations are not to be treated as referendums. Consultations are not ballots: they are opportunities for local authorities to listen to feedback, accommodate concerns and make refinements. The DfT does not expect consultations to return majority or consensus, as they know that levels of support always increase after consultation.

Do people support this?

Unquestionably. There is never instant 100% support for updating streets, but the level of support shown for improving Upper Shoreham Road has been shown, many times, to exceed the levels expected or required by the Department for Transport.

  • 2019 Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan consultation:
    89% of all local people who responded supported improving the cycling network
  • 2019 Adur & Worthing Open Space Study:
    78% of households confirmed that they would be prepared to walk/cycle further if the quality of the route was improved; and 81% also said that if the quality of the route was improved they would make the journey more often.
  • 2020 Shoreham Society Survey:
    60% of respondents said there are not enough safe cycle routes
  • 2020 Survey by Tim Loughton MP and Cllr Kevin Boram
    68% supported additional cycle routes and walking schemes
  • 2021 West Sussex County Council Active Travel Plan engagement
    65% support a permanent high quality cycling facility on Upper Shoreham Road
  • 2021 West Sussex County Council Active Travel Engagement
    Overall support and opposition for cycle lanes for Upper Shoreham Road was almost equal, with those opposing to some extent at 48% (788 respondents) compared to 48% (776 respondents) in support to some extent. A difference of 12 people. There is not strong opposition to installing safe segregated cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road, and support is higher than the level required by Department for Transport

How long have our councils been talking about a cycle route on Upper Shoreham Road?

Shoreham-By-Cycle has sourced many council documents, plans and strategies going back 30 years where there have been proposed cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road and talk of making Upper Shoreham Road safer for people to cycle on. These go back as far as West Sussex County Council’s Cycling Strategy 1994 and Adur District Council’s Cycling Strategy 1997, right up to Adur and Worthing Council’s 2020 Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan.

Documents from the 1990s, including a proposal to create a cycle route along Upper Shoreham Road

What standards are the proposals being designed to?

The project will seek to meet the guidance detailed for local authorities in the Government Local Transport Note 1/20 (Cycle Infrastructure Design). Beyond that, the Manual for Streets and the West Sussex Cycle Design Guide will also be considered.

The Department for Transport has recently set high standards for cycle infrastructure design

How much will this cost?

It is currently unclear what the final cost will be. However a rough guide is that it costs around £1.5 million per mile of cycle lane. Cycle infrastructure has been proven time and time again to be a very cost effective spend on infrastructure compared to other road infrastructure. For example the new roundabout on the A27 by New Monks Farm is currently projected to cost £25 million for one roundabout.

In order to be successful, any bid to the Government’s Active Travel Fund would need to demonstrate good Value for Money (VfM), which walking and cycle schemes generally do.

How will this be funded?

In 2020 the government promised £5 billion to improve bus and cycle routes outside of London. This will also be part of the government’s commitment on Active Travel, so will be funded by central government rather than local council tax.

Funding for the walking and cycling proposals will be dependent on a successful bid to the Tranche 4 of the DfT’s Active Travel Fund, which is expected to be announced later this year.

Is Upper Shoreham Road wide enough to put a cycle lane on?

Yes. Upper Shoreham Road, as the widest road in Shoreham, is more than wide enough to put safe cycle lanes in. There is no technical reason not to install cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road and improve safety for all road users.

A possible layout that makes better use of Upper Shoreham Road’s space


Here’s what West Sussex County Council has said about it:

Measurements have been taken at pinch points and it has been confirmed that sufficient width exists for the scheme options as presented, although we expect some adjustments to occur as the design progresses.”

Will cycle lanes help reduce the number of people cycling on the pavements?

Yes. With improved conditions for cycling, Shoreham-By-Cycle has monitored incidence of pavement cycling, which has been observed to reduce to just 25% of previous levels when cycle lanes are present. Pavement cycling is between three and five times more likely to occur where a cycle lane is not available.(Based on surveys conducted on Upper Shoreham Road in July 2020 and November 2020)

Have alternative routes been looked at?


Some councillors and commentators can be heard to suggest that a cycleway should take a different route through Shoreham. 

Upper Shoreham Road is the only road in Shoreham (apart from the A259)  which runs the whole length from east to west through Shoreham. It has been identified for 30 years as a strategic route which will benefit residents of north Shoreham, especially schoolchildren getting to and from school. An attempt to replicate Upper Shoreham Road’s utility along parallel streets would be impossible, leading instead to a twisting, complicated route with more danger, more hazards and more junctions – on streets too narrow to install proper infrastructure.

Here’s what West Sussex County Council say about it:

Alternative routes have been looked at and Upper Shoreham Road was prioritised because it was previously a pop-up scheme and it appears in the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan and is a top priority for Adur [District] Council.”

Will any trees or green spaces be removed near Buckingham Park?



There are no plans for any trees or any green spaces by Buckingham Park to be removed as part of any scheme to install cycle lanes on Upper Shoreham Road. There is more than enough space to create cycleways without any risk to these trees or green areas.

We are aware of a number of false rumours that have been circulated about this and they are untrue.

Will grass verges be removed?

Here is what West Sussex County Council have said about the removal of grass verges:

“Where possible removal of verge would be avoided. However, to ensure sufficient footway width is provided removal of verge would be required at critical locations.”

Will the scheme have an effect on road traffic noise?

Any proposed scheme should have a positive impact on traffic noise, doing away with the wasted space of a central reservation and other relics of an old trunk road, reducing speeding and making it feel more like the residential connector street it is.

Didn’t West Sussex County Council go to court over this?

Yes. West Sussex County Council admitted that they removed the pop up cycle lanes unlawfully. 

However, it is important to know that no-one is proposing to replace the pop-up lanes with a similar design. Instead, as WSCC have assured DfT is possible, we could see a serious, attractive, useful design, enabling WSCC to put right its past mistakes and the people of Shoreham to have more options for their short journeys.

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